Shared 22 hours ago, with 51 notes » via bernesemountaingoat - © source
# min pin   # minature pinscher   # gorgeous  


superbnature:

Ready To Run by RockhouseMotion http://ift.tt/1rgSjEZ

superbnature:

Ready To Run by RockhouseMotion http://ift.tt/1rgSjEZ

Shared 1 day ago, with 1,351 notes » via whatisshelties - © source
# sled dog   # beautiful  


thewonderwhippet:

fruitsgarden:

sometimes dogs get embarrassed that someone saw them acting anything other than a majestic and stoic beast

Oh… you saw that… uhm…

thewonderwhippet:

fruitsgarden:

sometimes dogs get embarrassed that someone saw them acting anything other than a majestic and stoic beast

Oh… you saw that… uhm…

Shared 1 day ago, with 292,059 notes » via simply-canine - © source
# rough collie   # gifs   # oops  


New British Flyball Record, and the first sub-16s time, clocked by Mansfield Marnicks at Oliver’s Mount, 27th July 2014.

Dogs are Pluto (Staffie x, 11” height dog), Bear (BC/WSD), Lycan (BC/WSD), and Flame (Crossbreed).

Shared 2 days ago, with 2 notes
# bfa   # british flyball association   # flyball record   # mansfield marnicks  


doggydayjob:

2ifbifrost:

image

Coincidentally, my mentor really dislikes Susan Garrett, so I’m incredibly sceptical of her training…. I know her recent agility stuff is not so great at least. I’d be interested in seeing Recallers, but not enough to pay for it.

I generally find her training pretty good - I used 2x2 weaves for Redog, and plan to again when Redog 2.0 is older. I use a LOT of IYC/Reverse Luring, and my trainer has trained with her.

I’ve heard the newer material isn’t as impressive. I know a lot of Recallers is outsourced to her students/assistants, but there’s also approximately a million people in it, so. Understandable. But, when you’re paying $500 for her feedback on your training, disappointing.

My big problem, which isn’t really fair, lol, is the marketing she does. I mean, I don’t begrudge her a living, and obviously she can get the prices she sets, I’m just grumbly I don’t value her offerings enough to pay those prices. I’m not a fan of her presentation style. 

My mentor also uses 2x2 weaves and I use reverse luring, but Garrett wasn’t the inventor of those methods. What my mentor really hates is how Garrett has a rule in her agility contracts saying you can’t train with any other trainer when you’re training with her. (I’m not sure why she originally added this rule, but I don’t think a second opinion is ever a bad thing even if the opinion itself isn’t great.) I’ve also seen some of our students go to train with her and then return with their dogs completely out of control. I’m not sure exactly what she’s doing in her classes, but it seems to be building speed without focus often enough that we’re catching the fallout. Apparently, she’s also started teaching this method where the dog is only allowed to take an obstacle if it’s been called first, so the handler would have to call each jump or the dog would stop short instead of driving the line. My mentor’s oldest dog was originally owned by one of Garrett’s apprentices, and he’s STILL a mess from that method even after a decade of re-training.

I haven’t seen much of her puppy raising/obedience training material except her Recallers promotional stuff, but it doesn’t seem much different from what everyone else does? For the price, I’d rather take a couple Fenzi courses at Gold.

This is really interesting/reassuring to read, since I have similar feelings about SG. Part of what worries me about her is the cult-like following she seems to inspire/encourage; I’ve always been taught that good dog training is about having an open and skeptical mind, and her methods seem to focus on a my-way-is-the-only-way type of thinking.

I know someone who knows her personally, and he says the training that she markets is noticeable different from the methods she uses for her own dogs (particularly the 2x2 weaves). Which also makes me uneasy.

Shared 2 days ago, with 8 notes » via doggydayjob - © source
# SG   # dog training   # agility   # doggydayjob   # 2ifbifrost  


Is Your Sighthound Fat?

simply-canine:

Sighthounds are not built like non-sighthound dogs. Not many people are aware of what a fat sighthound looks like, since an ideal weight sighthound looks emaciated by normal dog standards! So here’s a quick visual guide.

image

(Image from: Sighthound Underground: Does this martingale make my dog’s butt look big?)

Although individual dogs are different and there is no one weight that is good for all dogs of a certain breed, here are a few things to look for in judging your sighthound’s weight:

On an ideal weight sighthound, you will be able to:

-See several of your dog’s ribs, and some of their spine.

-See the tips of the hips.

-See a well-defined tuck in the waist.

Here’s some examples of ideal vs. obese sighthounds:

Ideal Greyhound:

image

Obese Greyhound:

image

Ideal Greyhound:

image

Obese Greyhound:

image

(From: Greyhound Crossroads: How to know if your Greyhound is at the proper weight)

As with any other type of dog, obesity in sighthounds can lead to numerous health problems. Although uniformed people might accuse you of starving your pet (happens all the time to me), keeping your sighthound at a good weight is vital to her health and well-being! Pet obesity is a huge problem with over 50% of dogs in the US being obese as of 2012. Don’t unintentionally contribute to this statistic with your lovely lithe sighthounds.

Shared 2 days ago, with 54 notes » via simply-canine - © source
# pet obesity   # sighthounds   # greyhounds  


Shared 3 days ago, with 60 notes » via kayanem - © source
# border collie   # dog agility  


IMG_8315.jpg by Irene Cotter on Flickr.
Shared 4 days ago
# australian shepherd   # aussie   # flyball dog  


dogjournal:

THE 66 DOGS PROJECT - "The 66 Dogs Project is an ongoing series of hand-painted portraits of dogs currently available for adoption across the United States."

Colorado-based artist Jenny Williams started the “66 Dogs Project" with the goal of helping shelter dogs find permanent homes across the U.S. Williams paints portraits of shelter dogs and includes the contact information of the various shelters on the paintings. She also tries to provide a sense of each dog’s personality in the art piece. When a dog is adopted, the adoptive family is given the portrait for free.

Two dogs at the Baltimore Humane Society, Kana and Sophia, are among the dogs included in the project.  “Both these dogs would make wonderful pets,” Wendy Goldband, Director of Marketing & Public Relations says.  “Potential adopters need to come and spend some one on one time with them and really get to know each’s wonderful personality.  We have all kinds of open space where potential adopters can come and visit.  It’s the best way to see any dog’s true colors – maybe this is a dog who likes belly rubs or who will follow you around like a shadow.  Maybe it’s a dog who loves to play catch.  These are traits you can’t see when walking by their cages in the kennel.”

People may nominate a shelter dog to be painted for the 66 Dogs Project by emailing a photo, description of the dog, and information about the shelter. Please share to help these dogs find great homes! (Photos from the 66 Dogs Project Facebook page

Shared 4 days ago, with 53 notes » via dogjournal - © source
# 66 dogs project   # art!   # dogs!   # shelter dogs  


noisydogbarks:

Out walking today and found someone else who has bought litter sibling puppies. I could cry. WHY do people think this is a good idea? I never used to see this, now I have a sibling puppy pair in nearly every puppy class. It’s mostly male-female pairs as well, or female-female, which of course isn’t going to be a disaster in 6-12months.

Of course, I know why it’s happening, it’s a well-known puppy mill scam. Puppy-mill owner brings out two puppies; “Oh, these are the last two left!” and mentions how lonely and sad the last puppy will be when the buyers take the other one. Bingo, double the sale.

A reputable and responsible breeder won’t ever sell you two puppies. It’s twice as much work, double the cost, and unless you’re careful, you’re going to end up with dogs who are inseparable … which isn’t as much fun as it sounds.

littleshadowpkmn commented on this “I’m not as much into the “real” dog world as some people (sadly, by circumstances I’m limited to sims), and I wasn’t really aware this was an issue. It would be more helpful to people to have nonjudgmental awareness, although I see you’re frustrated.”

I really could have phrased this better, and provided evidence. So!

There’s a really great article here: http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/13_1/features/Problems-Adopting-Two-Puppies-At-Once_16190-1.html which covers all the main points.

Adding one puppy to your family is awesome, fun, hard work, messy, expensive, time-consuming, and adorable. Two puppies is all that TWICE, but with increased chances of behavioural problems that you probably don’t want, like never being able to seperate the dogs as they age.

It’s also worth me admitting that yes, sometimes a responsible breeder DOES let someone take two puppies. It’s very rare, and usually there are very specific circumstances (such as both puppies are show quality, and it’s going to take another 12 months to really learn which is better suited to the show ring, or the breeder is letting someone else do the puppy raising/socialisation for a few weeks/months before one of the puppies goes back to the breeder).

Shared 5 days ago, with 4 notes » via noisydogbarks - © source
# sibling puppies   # two puppies!   # not the best idea ever