Companion Animal Psychology: The end for shock collars? »

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# shock collars   # e-collars   # dog training  


tempurafriedhappiness:

Bang with his MDM tag

tempurafriedhappiness:

Bang with his MDM tag

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# MDM   # mad dog metalworks   # mischief managed   # bang  


Anonymous said:
Vegans don't encourage dog training because doing tricks for entertainment is not why someone should be adopting a dog. That refers to people who train and exploit dogs on mass scales, not the average human who teaches their companion to fetch or roll over.  

whatisshelties:

beccasmonkey:

angerinyourbones:

beccasmonkey:

angerinyourbones:

beccasmonkey:

angerinyourbones:

firthof5th:

wait, so if i train dogs for a living, i’d be exploiting them?

i must be a shitty vegan then, that’s my life goal

Personally I think not training a dog and expecting it to figure out how to “behave” on its own is cruel. Training a dog not only teaches them skills to figure out life in human society but it also gives them mental and physical stimulation.

My dogs love training sessions and hate it when they end.

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with training a dog to “behave” in the way that we want it to, but I do have an issue with teaching it tricks (i.e. standing on its back feet with no help)

What’s wrong with tricks? Behavior is behavior.

I don’t condone teaching back flips but not out of some weird “tricks are bad” thing but because depending on the dog’s build it can be bad for their joints.

I feel that tricks like the one I listed are demeaning to the animal and I’m all about respecting them and not treating them like toys. Now it’s one thing to teach them useful things like sit, stay, lie down, heel, come, etc. or even an unusual thing like training the dog to keep a kid safe because the kid likes to run off and stuff or giving them a job like herding sheep (i.e. Border Collies). All of that is okay in my opinion, but tricks that are just for shiggles and have absolutely no true value to the dogs training are what I have a problem with.

Except yknow mental and physical enrichment. My dogs know tricks. Not as many as they should (I’m more into bmod than anything I want to do ALL THE BMOD) but they know sit pretty (often called beg), high five, “do your yoga”, “bang”, weave, etc etc. They also know some behaviors that border between tricks and just helpful behavior (between, over, under, on, off, paws (paw targeting), touch, back, speak, whoa, etc)

Guess I don’t respect my dogs even though my life revolves around them hahaha

Oh man. I love it when people try to say they respect their animals just because “their life revolves around them.” This doesn’t mean you respect them. I bet you could talk to some really shitty dog trainers (or horse trainers especially) and ask them if their life revolved around their animals and they would tell you yes, yes it does. I know a ton of shitty horse trainers that train and ride horses for a living and it’s literally almost their entire life but they don’t respect their animals one bit. But no, good try.

You see, physical and mental enrichment can be done without teaching dogs tricks of little to no value. Take your dog for a run. Play fetch with them. Take them swimming. All of that helps for physical enrichment. Worried about your dog’s mental enrichment? Teach them things that have value like teaching them to bring you your, I dunno, your slippers or the tv remote. Whatever. Although it isn’t the best solution, the dog is basically given a job and this helps with mental enrichment since the dog must have a vocabulary developed to know the difference between his toys and your slipper.

And you know what would help with both physical and mental enrichment? Agility courses.

It really just absolutely bugs me when people teach their dogs stupid tricks that have no true value when they could easily do a different approach but don’t want to. I don’t like any animals being taught these kinds of tricks period though. From dogs to horses to whales.

*No, I do not think this is exploitation. Just demeaning to the animals. A lack of respect basically.

You mention dog agility, but many trainers ENCOURAGE trick training for body awareness and relationship building.  The ‘beg’ trick and standing on their back legs unsupported are EXCELLENT muscle building exercises. Trick training also helps handlers learn to teach and helps teach dogs to learn.  Well known and successful handler Silva Trkman has produce several DVDs on trick training for better bonds, thinking skills and body awareness.  Maybe this fits into your ‘teach useful things’ mentality, but I guess my point is that ‘stupid’ tricks can have value.  I’m actually surprised you mentioned agility because it is basically training dogs to do ‘stupid’ tricks.  (I say this as someone who LOVES playing that game with my dogs.)

whatisshelties nailed it.

I teach my dogs tons of tricks, which might seem useless, but are actually incredibly helpful for their agility and general life skills. And by helpful, I mean reduce risk of injury, increase their physical capability, and aid in warm-ups and cool-downs, as well as mental enrichment and stimulation beyond the normal walking/hiking/swimming.

That includes backing up, paw, beg/sitting pretty, bow, twist left/right, “reach” (stand up on your hind legs and balance), hand target, paw target, perch (on object), in-the-box (climb into object), circus trick (perch and circle/left right)… that’s just off the top of my head based on what I’ve been doing with my puppy. All of it feeds into her agility foundation work.

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# tricks   # vegan dog training   # dog training   # agility  


doggydayjob:

daveysama:

w-ickeddd:

daveysama:

If someone buys a dog from a breeder (or anything related to that), I will judge them and dislike them solely based on that.

Wow. This is one of the single most ignorant things I’ve ever read. First of all, disliking someone solely based on something they did and not on the content of their character is really close-minded. Second of all, not all dog breeders are terrible and getting a dog from a breeder does not make you a bad person.

You can think it’s closed minded of me. But it’s choosing to add to the problems of overcrowded shelters and over breeding dogs to the point that they have chronic health issues. Adopting any animal is the best way to go.

What you’re describing is backyard breeding or milling. Responsible breeders conduct extensive health and temperament testing, monitor lineages to minimize inbreeding, limit the number of litters their bitches produce in a lifetime (most bitches from responsible breeders are bred two to three times at most), and only breed when they have more homes than puppies that could be produced from a pairing. Responsible breeders also adopt out their dogs on often very strict contracts that outline regulations for their care as well as a clause that the puppy MUST be returned to the breeder if the adopter ever cannot keep them for whatever reason. Responsibly bred dogs don’t end up in shelters or on the streets unless they somehow end up in the hands of an irresponsible owner. (I’ve noticed that many breeders microchip or tattoo their puppies now before adopting them, so if they do end up in a shelter, they can be returned to the breeder.)

Many breeders also work with breed-specific shelters and rescues to pair dogs with homes that were unable to receive a puppy from a particular pairing (Remember that there are generally more homes than puppies before a breeding occurs.), or for people who wanted a puppy but who the breeder thinks would do better with an older or mixed breed dog for whatever reason. (This is especially common in working- or sports-bred dogs, where novices to the breed might need experience with a less intense dog to provide suitable homes.)

Shelter dogs are fantastic for the average pet owner. But if you’re looking for a dog to fulfil a certain job, a responsibly bred dog is the safest bet.

If all breeders were responsible breeders, there would be no need for shelters and rescues beyond the shelters and rescues run by the breeders themselves.

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# responsible dog breeding   # shelter dogs   # rescue dogs  


angerinyourbones:

The best of breed and best of opposite sex Labradors at Westminster.

These dogs are obese and are showing at the most well known dog show. No wonder people think my fit dogs are emaciated if they think this is ideal!

Photos from the Westminster kennel club website

Now, I wouldn’t say our British dogs are much better, but they’re better than that. That is just horrific.

Comparison pic: http://cambremer.co.uk/home.htm

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# labrador   # fat dogs   # westminster   # crufts  


dogjournal:

The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show starts tomorrow. The agility competition was held today, and a Border Collie named Kelso was the winner. Click here for more information (Photos from the official Facebook page)

Delaney Ratner, Kelso’s owner, blogs at https://pointyreddog.wordpress.com/

Shared 2 months ago, with 21 notes » via dogjournal - © source
# westminster   # agility   # border collie   # delaney ratner  


Handling360.com

Ok, sorry, this is just me being silly. SG has many fine qualities, the primary one being her ability to market the shit out of herself (and she’s been one-upped by OMD recently).

But, I am always open to new ideas! I want to learn!

Video 1

48s: I’m already giggling. I can’t help it. If you spend the first minute telling me the moving stories of how you’ve changed thousands of lives, it just feels like emotional manipulation.

3mins: I’m sorry, are you trying to tell me your life story? Is this what this video is? Telling me you had multi-agility-champion dogs in the late 90’s is not winning me over.

7mins: PREDICTIVE NATURE. OMG. This is wonderful. A totally new and made-up term for the amalgamation of conditioned emotional responses and instinct. Also, you haven’t told me about your handling system yet.

8mins: 8 minutes to tell me that handling should be adapted for the individual dog (whilst generalising at the same time with your example). I knew this already. What am I going to learn from you?!

8:50: Ouch, bit of a smackdown on the 20-30yr bracket there. I can think of examples to disagree with that.

10:25: FIRST HANDLING TIP WHOOO! 1. Motion

10:40: Ok, we’re into actual handling tips now. 2: Physical Cues, 3. Verbal Cues, 4. Positional Cues , 5. Timing and Timeliness.

14mins: “You can see how similar we really are”, she says, with her private agility arena behind her and having spend 10mins recounting her national and international successes over the past 20 years.

I can’t believe there are another 3 videos and an ebook. I hope they’re more informative than this.

Shared 2 months ago, with 6 notes
# handling360   # not sold  


positive-press-daily:

 Golden Retrievers Key To Longest, Largest Dog Cancer Study Ever Conducted

When Jay Mesinger heard about a study seeking golden retrievers to help fight canine cancer, he immediately signed up 2-year-old Louie.
He and his wife know firsthand the toll of canine cancer: Louie is their fourth golden retriever. The first three died of cancer.
"They all had long lives but were taken by complications from one kind of cancer or another," said the Boulder, Colo., businessman.
For Louie and 2,999 other purebred goldens, it will be the study of a lifetime. Their lives — usually a 10-to-14-year span — will be tracked for genetic, nutritional and environmental risks to help scientists and veterinarians find ways to prevent canine cancer, widely considered the No. 1 cause of death in older dogs, said Dr. Rodney Page.
The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study will be the largest and longest dog study ever conducted, said Page, the study’s principal investigator, a professor of veterinary oncology and the director of the Flint Animal Cancer Center at Colorado State University.
The study will focus on three cancers that can be fatal to the dogs, including bone cancer, lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes) and a cancer in the blood vessels called hemangiosarcoma, Page said. He also expects the data to yield information about other dog diseases, like arthritis, hip dysplasia, hormonal and skin disorders and epilepsy, he said.
Read more.

positive-press-daily:

Golden Retrievers Key To Longest, Largest Dog Cancer Study Ever Conducted

When Jay Mesinger heard about a study seeking golden retrievers to help fight canine cancer, he immediately signed up 2-year-old Louie.

He and his wife know firsthand the toll of canine cancer: Louie is their fourth golden retriever. The first three died of cancer.

"They all had long lives but were taken by complications from one kind of cancer or another," said the Boulder, Colo., businessman.

For Louie and 2,999 other purebred goldens, it will be the study of a lifetime. Their lives — usually a 10-to-14-year span — will be tracked for genetic, nutritional and environmental risks to help scientists and veterinarians find ways to prevent canine cancer, widely considered the No. 1 cause of death in older dogs, said Dr. Rodney Page.

The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study will be the largest and longest dog study ever conducted, said Page, the study’s principal investigator, a professor of veterinary oncology and the director of the Flint Animal Cancer Center at Colorado State University.

The study will focus on three cancers that can be fatal to the dogs, including bone cancer, lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes) and a cancer in the blood vessels called hemangiosarcoma, Page said. He also expects the data to yield information about other dog diseases, like arthritis, hip dysplasia, hormonal and skin disorders and epilepsy, he said.

Read more.

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# golden retriever   # cancer study  


fyeahdogshowing:

Corgi herding sheep by jeffdillonphotography on Flickr.
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# corgi   # sheep   # herding  


Docking Thoughts

Unexpected opinion piece from Noisy Dog!

Actually, it’s just some thoughts. To preface, docking is now illegal here in the UK (unless you can get a vets cert. that the dogs are for working purposes).

I don’t understand the argument I hear from Americans that docking is purely and/or primarily a “freedom of choice” issue, ie. making it illegal removes their freedom of choice to dock or not.

Which … yes, yes it does remove the choice. It takes the position that removing your dog’s limb is cruel and unnecessary, and you shouldn’t be allowed to do that.

By making the docking debate about freedom of choice, you come across as incredibly obstinate and close-minded. It’s the “This is how I’ve always done it don’t tell me what to do!” argument. Make the docking debate about ability to work, about ability to move and perform, make it about pain/lack of pain in 2-5day old puppies, even make it about tradition and aesthetics, if you have to. I’m open to listening to all those arguments, because they provide a reason which is at least partially based on your dog.

I suspect this is a cultural boundary that I can’t get my head around.

P.S. I know, I know. It IS a cultural boundary, and it’s currently particularly contentious due to the breeder-restriction laws and the bizarre hold PETA et al have in the States.

Shared 6 months ago, with 2 notes
# docking   # dogs